Danya Institute Inc.

Clinical Supervision

Therapy Talk: Guidelines for Supervision

Dr. Michael Baltimore from Columbus State University gives 20 simple guidelines for professionals and students entering clinical supervision. This video would be useful for anyone entering the field or continuing their education, and might be appropriate for supervisors themselves. This video was created by Columbus State Television and is available on their YouTube channel Coehptv. (00:09:48)

LINK: http://youtu.be/UdLBKfNYRQc

 

Supervision Models

Bob Cooke, a Transactional Analysis oriented therapist, describes the Hawkins and Shohet model of supervision as outlined in their textbook, “Supervision in the Helping Professions.” The model’s seven stages include: 1) Content of the session, 2) Strategies-treatment-interventions, 3) The therapy relationship, 4) The therapist’s process, 5) The supervisory relationship, 6) The supervisor’s process, and 7) The wider context. Clinicians may or may not agree with this specific model of supervision. This video could be useful for professionals at any stage of the supervisory process. This video is available at www.psychotherapysupervision.net. (00:10:55)

LINK: http://youtu.be/Fz0Bj_pi1pc

 

Clinical Supervision—Check List

Bob Cooke, founder of Manchester Institute for Psychotherapy, offers his own checklist for effective clinical supervision. He highlights key points such as knowing the professional developmental level of the supervisee, acting as a gatekeeper to protect the client, and using contracts to agree on parameters and expectations. Dr. Cooke suggests that supervisors aim to stretch supervisees professionally so that they continually learn and grow. This video is in a PowerPoint format with Dr. Cooke narrating. It is available on the Bob Cooke YouTube channel titled. (00:06:25)

LINK: http://youtu.be/o5zPhPWpK0g

 

Clinical Supervision: How to be Effective

Bob Cooke, founder of Manchester Institute for Psychotherapy, narrates the criteria that create an effective learning environment for clinical supervision. Such criteria include: choosing the right supervisor; knowing your own best learning style; developing your own internal supervisor; deepening your reflective skills; using a support network; contracting for goals and outcomes; considering openness, curiosity, excitement, and risk-taking; and presenting and recording cases in case consultation. This video, which is intended for professional supervisees rather than supervisors, is available on the YouTube channel ‘Bob Cooke.’ and could be started at (00:02:28). (00:11:12)

LINK: http://youtu.be/Sq3RYMIAi9s

 

Narrative Supervision: Externalization with Supervisee

This video exemplifies a narrative approach to clinical supervision through a role-play of the externalization technique. As with narrative therapy, the ‘problem’ that the supervisee brings to the supervisor’s attention is externalized so that the two individuals can collaborate against the problem, rather than perceiving the problem as within the supervisee herself. This approach is meant to displace blame and allow the supervisee to feel more comfortable in describing the problem. This video gives a good example of this type of supervision but ends abruptly without a conclusion to the role-play. This video is available on the CounselorEdVideos YouTube channel created and maintained by a group of doctoral students in Counselor Education and Supervision. (00:04:44)

LINK: http://youtu.be/So6q3H5vdZw

 

Narrative Supervision: Titling

This video exemplifies a narrative approach to clinical supervision through a role-play of the titling technique. The supervisee is asked questions about how she views her role or career as a counselor: If it were a story, what would she title it? What themes would she pull out of the story? This approach helps supervisees see the bigger picture of their development as a counselor, which gives them strength and resilience to draw from in the future. This video gives a good example of this technique but also ends abruptly without a conclusion to the role-play. This video is available on the CounselorEdVideos YouTube channel created and maintained by a group of doctoral students in Counselor Education and Supervision. (00:04:26)

LINK: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmSEVDPBQB0

 

Narrative Supervision: Interviewing the Supervisor

This video exemplifies a narrative approach to clinical supervision by way of role-playing a supervisee interviewing a supervisor about a particular issue she feels she’s having with a client. In this approach, the supervisor aims to break down some of the power imbalance inherent in supervision by suggesting the supervisee ask him questions about his similar experiences and how he handled them rather than merely passively receiving the supervisor’s advice on the issue. He explains that he’d like to do this because his opinion is only one perception on how to approach the problem. This video does not conclude with a description of the role-play but does a good job of illustrating this approach. This video is available on the CounselorEdVideos YouTube channel created and maintained by a group of doctoral students in Counselor Education and Supervision. (00:3:35)

LINK: http://youtu.be/HA6c1JdC-sY

 

Narrative Supervision: Creating a Team or an Audience

This video exemplifies a narrative approach to clinical supervision through a role-play of the team creation technique. After the supervisee explains something she did well in session, the supervisor asks her to describe who the voices were within her that were guiding her through the session. He also asks what they were saying and provides her with encouragement. This allows the supervisee to compliment herself in an indirect way and to pay attention to her intuitive cues. This video does not conclude with a description of the role-play, but it does a good job of illustrating this example. This video is available on the CounselorEdVideos YouTube channel created and maintained by a group of doctoral students in Counselor Education and Supervision. (00:05:37)

LINK: http://youtu.be/V-nz4lUhVPY

 

Transactional Analysis Theory in Supervision

Bob Cooke, founder of the Manchester Institute for Psychotherapy, discusses integrating the Transactional Analysis (TA) theory into clinical supervision. He briefly describes the major tenets of TA: ego states, transactions, scripts, contracts, strokes, and the relational framework between therapist to supervisor and therapist to client. He then describes how each concept relates to the aforementioned relationships in clinical supervision and therapy. This video is appropriate for professionals who want to learn more about the TA style of supervision, as well as for those interested in learning more about TA in general. This video is available on the Bob Cooke YouTube channel. (00:05:06)

LINK: http://youtu.be/cFL0izzoF9E

 

Sources for more short videos on CLINICAL SUPERVISION